David Dopkin, Attorney at Law-Attorney At law

Call for a free consultation with a trusted,
experienced SSD and SSI lawyer

Local
281-407-8026
Toll free
800-481-7359
view our practice areas

Houston Social Security Disability Law Blog

How to appeal a Supplemental Security determination

Applying for and receiving disability benefits can be essential. Just as it is true of Social Security disability, applicants for Supplemental Security Income have the option to appeal if they do not agree with the decision made by the Social Security Administration or SSA regarding their benefits. In the case of Supplemental Security Income, the applicant can appeal the SSA's decision concerning benefits and the amount of benefit the disabled individual will receive.

When the Social Security Administration has denied a disabled applicant Supplemental Security Income or made changes to their benefit amount, they may have the option to ask the SSA to take a look at their application again. The first step in the appeals process is a request for reconsideration when the disabled applicant asks the Social Security Administration to take a second look at their case. The disabled applicant can ask the SSA to re-visit if they are eligible for benefits and the amount of benefit they should receive and any overpayment may also be reviewed.

Options to help maximize Social Security disability

Social Security disability are important benefits to help disabled individuals with their daily needs and the challenges they face. Because of how important Social Security disability benefits are for many struggling disabled individuals and their families, it is essential for disabled individuals to be familiar with how they can maximize their benefits and receive their full benefit.

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, one in four adults in the United States reports suffering from a disability. That number represents 61 million Americans suffering from a disability and potentially needing help. Social Security disability benefits may be available to individuals who suffer from a physical or mental medical condition that interferes with their daily activities and prevents them from working. In addition, one of the requirements for Social Security disability is that the disabled individual worked so that they paid Social Security taxes.

The differences between SSD and SSI benefits and how they help

Social Security disability benefits and Supplemental Security Income benefits are different programs that can help disabled individuals in different situations. As a result, it is helpful for disabled individuals to be familiar with their different disability options, how they can help them and how to obtain the benefits they require.

Both types of benefits are based on a qualifying medical condition that prevents the disabled individual from working. There are some differences, however, as to who may be able to qualify for Social Security disability benefits versus who may be able to qualify for Supplemental Security Income.

Preparing for a Special Security disability hearing is important

The Social Security Disability hearing is an important part of the process of applying for Social Security Disability benefits for all Texans. The hearing can help determine if the disabled applicant will have their claim for benefits approved or denied, which is why it is important for disabled applicants to be prepared for their Social Security Disability hearing.

To begin with, disabled applicants should not be nervous during their Social Security Disability hearing and should always provide concise and truthful answers to the questions they receive. Disabled individuals may be asked about their medical condition, including their symptoms, medications, pain and range of motion; their physical and mental abilities; their medical history; their training and education; their employment history; and their day-to-day activities.

Can I qualify for disability because of a mental condition?

Social Security disability benefits can help disabled individuals with their daily needs and expenses. Social Security disability (SSD) benefits can assist disabled individuals who are unable to work because they suffer from a qualifying medical condition severe enough that it prevents them from working.

In addition to qualifying physical medical conditions, disabled individuals may be able to qualify for Social Security disability for mental conditions. Eligibility for Social Security disability benefits is based on an inability to work because of a medical condition the disabled individual suffers from. Just like suffering from a physical medical condition that prevents the disabled individual from working, a disabled individual suffering from a mental medical condition that prevents them from working will need to demonstrate that their mental condition is severe enough that it prevents them from working.

The Social Security disability appeals process

Many, if not most, initial applications for Social Security disability (SSD) benefits are denied. As a result, it is essential for disabled individuals and their families to be familiar with the appeals process and what it is so they understand both how to apply for benefits and appeal when they have been denied Social Security disability benefits.

To initially apply for Social Security disability benefits the applicant must meet both the medical and work history requirements to be eligible to qualify for SSD benefits. The medical requirement includes that the disabled individual suffers from a medical condition that is severe enough that it prevents them from working and is expected to last 12 months or longer or result in death. The disabled individual also must have worked long enough to earn enough work history credits to receive benefits. When a disabled individual believes they have met these requirements, but have been denied benefits, 4 levels of appeal are available to them.

Understanding Supplemental Security Income

Supplemental Security Income is an important benefit available to disabled individuals and others. SSI may provide protections to disabled individuals who do not qualify for Social Security Disability benefits. Supplemental Security Income can provide help with every day costs and expenses for those who qualify for SSI.

Disabled individuals who suffer from a disability that prevents them from being able to be gainfully employed, but who lack the sufficient work history to qualify for Social Security Disability benefits, may be able to qualify for Supplemental Security Income. Disabled individuals who qualify for SSI benefits also qualify for Medicaid for their healthcare needs. Supplemental Security Income is a different option for disabled individuals who do not qualify for SSD benefits.

SSI benefits are available to people over 65

Although this blog has discussed it before, it is important for Houston, Texas residents to be reminded from time to time that one does not always have to have a disability in order to qualify for Supplemental Security Income, or SSI.

Indeed, a Houston resident who has turned 65 years old, even if she is otherwise perfectly healthy, can qualify for Supplemental Security Income. SSI benefits are available to individuals over 65 who otherwise meet the legal requirements for receiving this benefit.

We help Texans who have hard-to-measure claims

Some of the most difficult disability claims for a Houston resident to prove to the satisfaction of the Social Security Administration are what can be called hard-to-measure illnesses and injuries.

A hard-to-measure condition can include conditions like chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia and frequent migraines. The problem a Houston resident might face with getting SSDI or SSI benefits for these conditions is that there are no obvious physical signs the Administration can rely on to confirm or deny the condition.

Can you still work while receiving Social Security Disability?

There are so many pervasive myths about Social Security benefits. If you believe some of those myths, you may think that you don't have the option of applying for benefits when you might actually qualify for them. You could also make another mistake, like not disclosing pertinent information, that could leave you vulnerable in the future.

One of the issues claimants struggle to understand, in part because the issue is reviewed on a case-by-case basis, is whether someone can qualify for Social Security Disability (SSD) benefits if they still work. Many people with disabilities that prevent them from working full-time jobs or even part-time jobs outside of the home can work a few hours a week or do some paid work out of their home.